Possibility Thinking…..

Several years back there was a television preacher who advocated and taught the power of positive thinking. Depending upon which side of the Christian fence one was on determined how his message was viewed. Some cried foul, misrepresentation of the scriptures, Christianity-lite, and some embraced his teaching. Because of the doctrine I was being fed at the time, I stood with the misrepresentation crowd, and not necessarily by choice. It was confusing to me why thinking positively was a bad thing, but what did I know? Didn’t the Bible tell us to do that?

Philippians 4:8-9 says, “focus your thoughts on what is true, noble, righteous, pure, lovable or admirable, on some virtue or on something praiseworthy. Keep doing what you have learned and received from me, what you have heard and seen me doing; then the God who gives shalom (peace) will be with you.” (The Complete Jewish Bible). The answer is yes, the Bible does tell us to think positively. The Bible also takes thinking a step further and crosses right over into doing, which makes more sense. Thinking positively is a good start, but it isn’t the whole enchilada! Paul is teaching an if/then concept here. Now, realizing I am quick to point out the Bible has been massaged many times over so we can’t truly be certain anything is stated as it was, or if it was, originally, I do maintain there is wisdom to be found even if the words and concepts aren’t 100% authentic. As I have stated before, I believe God watches over His message, concerned more with intent than exact wording. So the message in its entirety becomes train your mind to think positive thoughts and the thoughts will lead to positive acts; the result will be God’s peace in the midst of doing His will.

Like begets like; positive and negative thinking not excluded. The more negative thoughts we have, the more our speech becomes negative, and soon negativity seems to be closing in on us. In essence, we paint ourselves into a box, a black box of doom, gloom, and depression. Thinking and speaking positively allows us to see other possibilities in the midst of problems in our lives. Life is not fair, life is difficult at times, and how we approach those times will affect our perception of the outcome, and may even affect the outcome itself.

Training the mind and heart to think and speak positively is a process. Isn’t everything? In the beginning we have to practice thinking and speaking from a positive viewpoint, looking for the good versus the bad in all situations; no easy task for many. The Charismatic mindset, from my past experience, is a form of positive thought and word, and yet it often seeks to deny the reality. I heard a well-known Charismatic evangelist say that if he had a headache he would rebuke it, tell the headache to go away, but would never admit to anyone he had a headache. In psychological terms that is called denial, some would just call it a lie. His teachings and beliefs were and are commonplace, often based on scriptures like Mark 11:23-24Yes! I tell you that whoever does not doubt in his heart but trusts that what he says will happen can say to this mountain, `Go and throw yourself into the sea!’ and it will be done for him. Therefore, I tell you, whatever you ask for in prayer, trust that you are receiving it, and it will be yours. ” (The Complete Jewish Bible) Charismatic theology has been deemed by some as the “name it claim it” theology largely because of idolatry of scriptures like these.

Personally, I don’t have a problem with the above scripture; my opposition comes with how we use any scripture. Having known plenty of Charismatic adherents, scriptures like Mark 11:23-24 are treated as if they are edicts from on high, given far too much power, makes the focus about us rather than God, and are often spoken as an incantation, of sorts. This is misuse of the scriptures. Yeshua (Jesus) left us with the possibilities, a way of thinking differently to open the minds of His followers. Keep in mind the religious leaders of the day were among the few literate, and therefore those who were not depended upon them for interpretation of The Law. Yeshua is debunking that mindset when He says, “if anyone…” Anyone is you, me, the guy down the street; anyone is not just the person standing at the pulpit. Yeshua is saying with faith, ordinary people have power within them that can move mountains; the playing field has been leveled. Open the mind to possibilities!

Here is where we go astray; when the outcome is not what we expect, we assume we have done something wrong, or someone is quick to point out if we only we had a little more faith the ‘mountain’ would have moved. That mindset breaks people! Instead of allowing our relationship to teach and transform us on our journey, we become disillusioned, believing we have failed, and negativity moves in and sets up housekeeping. Some “get mad” at God, or lose faith in Him because He didn’t do what we said. What’s wrong with that picture?

Another scripture often used in the Charismatic/Pentecostal venue is Mark 16:17-18 “And these signs will accompany those who do trust: in my name they will drive out demons, speak with new tongues, not be injured if they handle snakes or drink poison, and heal the sick by laying hands on them.” (The Complete Jewish Bible) The extreme adherents are those who actually handle snakes, or drink poison; the remainder believe it possible when needed, or smorgasbord the list believing in new tongues and healing the sick, yet set aside the snakes and poison. Again, I believe it more a concept to teach a principle rather than an actual directive; the concept being the impossible is possible when we believe, or trust God is capable. Too often we put God in a box of impossibility, in other words, deciding He can do this, but probably not that.  To say with faith we can do the impossible through His is to demonstrate a principle.  The above scripture discussion in Mark allegedly took place following the resurrection when Yeshua (Jesus) appeared to His disciples, rebuking them for not believing He had risen, showing He had just done the impossible.

The possibility also exists this scripture was not found in the original texts at all. Mark was a friend of Peter, not having the advantage of actually walking with Yeshua as Peter did. Biblical scholars also note that Mark wrote more about what Yeshua did as opposed to what He said. Some of the earliest manuscripts end the Gospel of Mark at verse 8 of chapter 16 when Mary Magdalene went to the tomb, later versions include verses 9-20 completing the resurrection and Yeshua’s appearance to others following, so we really have no clear directive at all, it seems, for driving out demons, handling snakes, drinking poison, speaking in new tongues, or healing the sick.

What if this scripture was meant to be metaphorical? Is it possible these scriptures are related? Yeshua said do what He does. How did He live His life? He lived a life of peace, of trust, of power. His thoughts were focused on His Father, in other words, positive thoughts. As Yeshua journeyed through His life clothed in the flesh of humanity, He healed the sick, cast out demons (negativity fled), the words He spoke were definitely new to the ears who were able to hear, and He called the religious leaders of the day vipers. The curses, or poison of those opposed to His teaching did not harm Him. In Him, we can do the same. Possibility thinking? Perhaps…..

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s